Where should we make a green makeover happen?

Where should we make a green makeover happen?
Sprout Guerrilla is a social purpose business that is passionate about enabling people to participate in urban sustainability in fun and simple ways. A city that is vibrant, healthy, and sustainable is a beautiful one. Adding green spaces to dull and drab spots in the concrete jungle is a small yet impactful way to reflect a brighter and greener future. Help to choose a space in Toronto that is in need of a green makeover, and transform the ordinary into a refreshing and inspiring work of art!
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Artscape Wychwood Barns' Information Kiosk

Artscape Wychwood Barns' Information Kiosk
“FOR YOUR INFORMATION” is a design ideas competition for a new outdoor information kiosk at Artscape Wychwood Barns with concepts provided by Ryerson University architecture students. This student design exercise represents an imagining of what a contemporary kiosk could be. Should the project develop further, public consultations will be held with the community and other stakeholders for maximum input. VOTE NOW for your favourite design!
18 Designs

Market 707's New Public Patio

Market 707's New Public Patio
Help us transform Market 707 – Toronto's only shipping container market - into an even more unique urban space. Market 707 may have the tasty food, the really cool cooking vessels and the international culinary map covered, but what we don't have is an outdoor patio space for people to sit comfortably, engage in conversation, watch the streetcars go by and, oh yeah, enjoy their amazing food from the market. We could also really use a portable stage for outdoor community events. Please help us reach our goal and donate today!
$6,500 raised
15 Designs
8 Volunteers

South Philly High School's Greening Plan

South Philly High School's Greening Plan
South Philadelphia High School has the potential to transform its concrete-dominated 5.5 acre urban campus into a beautiful and dynamic green environment, but we need your help! The development of a campus-wide Greening Master Plan and the employment of a Garden Coordinator are the first steps in enabling this historic institution to transform itself and establish a bold new precedent for public schools in Philadelphia. In the face of a crumbling public school system, you have the power to help us create innovative outdoor educational opportunities for South Philly High's diverse student body and the greater community. Improvements will include an educational rooftop farm, outdoor classrooms and ground-level improvements like rain gardens and tree plantings aimed at empowering students and residents and fostering innovation. The community-driven project will demonstrate sustainable campus design strategies that address stormwater management, fresh food access, healthy eating and outdoor education. Thank you for your support!
$27,350 raised
1 Volunteer

Featured designsWant to get great ideas and designs for your own project?

BLIP

BLIP
Anthony Gugliotta, Kyle Marren
A kiosk design for wychwood barns that is functional, aesthetic, and iconic. The form is reminiscent of a speech bubble which is analogous for communication and a clear signifier of information. By adopting a kiosk design that is iconic, the intent of the design is clear to the user who sees it from a distance. By integrating a collection of essential elements, the kiosk becomes multifunctional. Typical kiosk elements include: 4 touch-screen information boards, brochure and print information holders, and analog signage. The design for the kiosk allows it to deliver information, as well as provide a generous amount of seating for passersby. The screens on either side of the kiosk allow the user to quickly get information and go, or sit while they browse the interiorfacing information board for the latest news and events. The bench component is wide enough to accommodate 4 people side by side, or a single person lying down. Overhead lights on the interior extend the usable hours of the kiosk if evening use is required. The proposed design includes solar panels on the top of the kiosk to help generate the energy necessary to power the lights at night, and supplement energy to the electronic displays. The design is achieved through a combination of analog and digital techniques. The interior frame is envisioned to be cnc’d from 1/2” plywood, and secured by a combination of cross-sectional profiles and dowel connections. The digitally manufactured frame acts as the formwork for bending the outer plywood sections which are comprised of several layers of thinner plywood, clamped and secured into place. Weight relief is provided at the top through cutaway material, in order to lower the centre of gravity and ensure the frame does not tip. A hidden cabinet on the flat end of the kiosk provides space to hold a computer without compromising the integrity of the design. On either side of the flat end, two monitors provide the primary means of sharing information. If mobility is desired, the design can easily be adapted to casters due to the flat bottom.

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Wychwood Barns Kiosk

Wychwood Barns Kiosk
Tiffany Tse, Jenny Leung
The need for a kiosk at Wychwood Barns demands for a design that is functional, adaptive and informative for the users at The Barns. The placement and location chosen is the most interactive space in the outdoor area, creating a direct passage to the main building and open distribution of information to the public. Designed to address the circulation of pedestrian volumes, the design of triangulated forms is the aesthetic element of the kiosk. The voids in-between each triangulation allows for high visibility of surrounding activities from within. Through sun infiltration, the shadow configurations casted on the ground would create an intricate patterning in the space. The kiosk is made up of structural plywood and glulam wood, creating a warm and inviting atmosphere. Intended to be a permanent structure bolted to the ground, it addresses durability and accessibility of the kiosk, in relation to the site and the users. Information such as maps, activities, events, calendar, weather and brochures are provided and, in addition, the kiosk allows for mobile connectivity and consists of a charging station. The design of the kiosk will enhance the interaction of people at Wychwood Barns and become an icon in the community.

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Centripetal

Centripetal
Victor Huynh, Agatha Kwiatkowski
Wychwood Barns provides the surrounding communities with year-round activities, however, at the moment there is no central information location where visitors can discover everything that is happening. The design of the kiosk utilizes five arches that come together at a point representative of the information from the five barns coming together at the location of the kiosk. The wood used can be recycled to provide a more ecofriendly design. During the summer vines grow atop the wooden slats providing a more enclosed shaded space, while during the winter the vines are gone and the kiosk becomes skeletal, in the way that deciduous trees do. The opening to the kiosk is located perpendicular to the flow of pedestrian traffic, therefore encouraging the visitors to pass through. They have the option to stop and view the information or to continue walking. Information is presented on two different media; an interactive touch screen where the large events and weekly schedules would be presented, and a bulletin board where people can advertise their own events. The site chosen for the project is near the west entrance onto the site before the barns. This is the where the widest pedestrian passage is located, and is in an open area where the kiosk would be visible from all angles.

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[Inter]volve

[Inter]volve
Anna Pavia, Angela Ng
The design reinterprets the function of Wychwood Barns from a place that once held the capacity of streetcars to a hub servicing the activities of a diverse and vibrant community. The general approach to the informational kiosks is to reuse the existing elements of the site and highlight the diversity of the community. Referring to the original function of the Barns, a place of storage for streetcars, the proposed informational kiosks are nodes that store information, feeding visitors with knowledge and directing them across the site. An interactive landscape is proposed as a directional and way-finding mechanism while highlighting visitors’ circulation and congregation patterns. As visitors walk through Wychwood Barns, temporary records of their footsteps are preserved. Thelandscape displays the pedestrian traffic by modular square tiles that absorb both solar and kinetic energy during the day to then release and illuminate the landscape at night. The energy generated serves as a media outlet, providing both a physical and virtual-media interaction between users and the installation. This interactive language is further developed in the design of the informational kiosks, where interactive panels are used to display news and events of Wychwood Barns and the Ward 21 Community. The diversity of the community is addressed in the multi-faceted design, where panels can be rotated and manipulated, creating a playful environment. From the awning in which they are hung, the panels are capable of sliding and thus the information kiosk can be manipulated into several configurations. At night, panels facing the park can be brought together to show films. The two parallel sets of steel beams that run along the existing trellis are repurposed as part of the new informational kiosk. They are repositioned and reused as the track for the panels to slide across, creating a wider corridor under the beams. This allows for greater accessibility of the interior panels. Accessibility is also addressed with the panels at various heights, allowing for a variety of users to interact with the kiosk. Since the site of the informational kiosk receives a great amount of sunlight, photovoltaic cells are installed above the interactive panels and across the existing trellis to collect solar energy that powers the interactive panels. Acting as a shelter, these roof-panels allow for year-round access and shelter for visitors between the two layers of interactive panels. The flexibility offered by this modular approach allows for interactive panels to be applied in other nodes in Wychwood Park, such as the site of the transformer. Using the existing wood panels, a track system can be installed to facilitate the sliding movement of the panels.

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Wychwood Barns Information Kiosk

Wychwood Barns Information Kiosk
Giovanna Monaco, Eric Reid
Wychwood Barns new informational Kiosk located conveniently at the intersection of Christie and Benson not only serves as an informational kiosk to the Barns, but a community shelter for the surround residences. When approaching the site, the kiosk looks as though it is a part of the natural terrain, however with a closer view you come to notice its steel waffle structure that holds its shape. The structures frame is also home to a variety of interactive digital displays both on the interior and exterior of the kiosk, keeping visitors up to date on information on the site and surrounding news. Finally the structure forms a bike wall, aiding visitors in storage, and encouraging more bike transients. The new Kiosk will serve as a digital hub and blend in with the surrounding street views.

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Who is Projexity?

The projexiteam is composed of architects, landscape architects, urban designers, programmers and strategists that understand the needs of your project and are eager to bring great urban improvement to cities around the world.
Learn more about the projexiteam

Projexity is also everyone — from moms to mayors — that strives to improve cities (that includes you!)

Thanks to Projexity, we were able to engage Torontonians and build an awesome community amenity that is transforming our strip of Dundas street. We could not have done this alone!